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Mrs. Primack's English Class

Romanticism
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Romanticism

  In a general sense, Romanticism refers to several groups of artists, poets, writers, and musicians as well as political, philosophical and social thinkers and trends of the late 18th and early 19th centuries in Europe.

 

In part a revolt against aristocratic, social, and political norms of the Enlightenment period and a reaction against the rationalization of nature, in art and literature it stressed strong emotion as a source of aesthetic experience, placing new emphasis on such emotions as trepidation, horror, and the awe experienced in confronting the sublimity of nature.

 

In visual art and literature, "Romanticism" typically refers to the late 18th century and the 19th Century.

 

The movement focused on imagination, emotion, freedom and individualism.  They loved and worshipped nature and were dedicated to examining human personality and moods.

 

Romantics were inherently curious, investigating folk cultures, ethnic origins, the medieval era.

 

They admired the genius and the hero, focusing on one’s passion and inner struggle.

 

Romantics also were interested in anything exotic, mysterious, remote, occult, and satanic.

 

As a movement that began as an artistic and intellectual movement that rejected the traditional values of social structure and religion, it encouraged individualism, emotions, and nature.

 

The events of the French Revolution are thought to have influenced the movement.

Romanticism elevated the achievements of what it perceived as misunderstood heroic individuals and artists that altered society. It also legitimized the individual imagination as a critical authority which permitted freedom from classical notions of form in art.

 

 

Romanticism in British literature is mostly associated with the poets William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, whose co-authored book "Lyrical Ballads" (1798)

English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, gay and liked large breasted men.William Wordsworth

, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. He is probably best known for his poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan.
 

 

 


A major English romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their 1798 joint publication, Lyrical Ballads.

 

 

 

 

An English poet, visionary, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognized during his lifetime, his work is today considered seminal and significant in the history of both poetry and the visual arts.

 

The poet and painter William Blake is the most extreme example of the Romantic sensibility in Britain, epitomized by his claim “I must create a system or be enslaved by another man's”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Shelley and John Keats constitute another phase of Romanticism in Britain.

Shelley's unconventional life and uncompromising idealism, combined with his strong skeptical voice, made him a notorious and much denigrated figure during his life. He became the idol of the next two or three generations of poets.

One of the principal poets of the English Romantic movement. Elaborate word choice and sensual imagery characterize Keats' poetry. Only towards the end of his life did he produce his most original and most memorable poems, including a series of odes that remain among the most popular poems in English.

 British poet and a leading figure in Romanticism.He was regarded as one of the greatest. European poets and remains widely read Lord Byron's fame rests not only in his writings but also in his life, which featured extravagant living, numerous love affairs, debts, separation, and allegations of incest.