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Mrs. Primack's English Class

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 prostrate - pinnacle

pros·trate
Pronunciation: 'prä-"strAt
Function:
adjective
Etymology: Middle English prostrat, from Anglo-French, from Latin prostratus, past participle of prosternere, from pro- before + sternere to spread out, throw down -- more at
STREW
1 : stretched out with face on the ground in adoration or submission; also : lying flat
2 : completely overcome and lacking vitality, will, or power to rise <was prostrate from the heat>
3 : trailing on the ground
: PROCUMBENT
<prostrate shrubs>
synonym see
PRONE

 

pleth·o·ra
Pronunciation: 'ple-th&-r&
Function:
noun
Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Greek plEthOra, literally, fullness, from plEthein to be full -- more at
FULL
1 : a bodily condition characterized by an excess of blood and marked by turgescence and a florid complexion
2
: EXCESS, SUPERFLUITY; also : PROFUSION, ABUNDANCE

- ple·tho·ric
/pl&-'thor-ik, ple-, -'thär-; 'ple-th&-rik/ adjective

 

pal·pi·tate
Pronunciation: 'pal-p&-"tAt
Function:
intransitive verb
Inflected Form(s): -tat·ed; -tat·ing
Etymology: Latin palpitatus, past participle of palpitare, frequentative of palpare to stroke
: to beat rapidly and strongly
: THROB

- pal·pi·ta·tion
/"pal-p&-'tA-sh&n/ noun

 

pro·pi·tious
Pronunciation: pr&-'pi-sh&s
Function:
adjective
Etymology: Middle English propycyous, from Anglo-French propicius, from Latin propitius, probably from pro- for + petere to seek -- more at
PRO-, FEATHER
1 : favorably disposed : BENEVOLENT
2 : being a good omen : AUSPICIOUS
<propitious sign>
3 : tending to favor
: ADVANTAGEOUS
synonym see
FAVORABLE
- pro·pi·tious·ly adverb
- pro·pi·tious·ness noun

 

ex·tri·cate
Pronunciation: 'ek-str&-"kAt
Function:
transitive verb
Inflected Form(s): -cat·ed; -cat·ing
Etymology: Latin extricatus, past participle of extricare, from ex- + tricae trifles, perplexities
1 a archaic
: UNRAVEL
b : to distinguish from a related thing
2 : to free or remove from an entanglement or difficulty
- ex·tri·ca·ble
/ik-'stri-k&-b&l, ek-', 'ek-(")/ adjective
- ex·tri·ca·tion
/"ek-str&-'kA-sh&n/ noun
synonyms
EXTRICATE, DISENTANGLE, UNTANGLE, DISENCUMBER, DISEMBARRASS mean to free from what binds or holds back. EXTRICATE implies the use of care or ingenuity in freeing from a difficult position or situation <extricated himself from financial difficulties>. DISENTANGLE and UNTANGLE suggest painstaking separation of a thing from other things <disentangling fact from fiction> <untangle a web of deceit>. DISENCUMBER implies a release from something that clogs or weighs down <an article disencumbered of jargon>. DISEMBARRASS suggests a release from something that impedes or hinders <disembarrassed herself of her advisers

 

guf·faw
Pronunciation: (")g&-'fo, 'g&-"fo
Function:
noun
Etymology: imitative
: a loud or boisterous burst of laughter
- guf·faw
/(")g&-'fo/ intransitive verb

 

ig·no·min·i·ous
Pronunciation: "ig-n&-'mi-nE-&s
Function:
adjective
1 : marked with or characterized by disgrace or shame
: DISHONORABLE
2 : deserving of shame or infamy : DESPICABLE
3 : HUMILIATING, DEGRADING
<suffered an ignominious defeat>
- ig·no·min·i·ous·ly adverb
- ig·no·min·i·ous·ness noun

 

deem
Pronunciation: 'dEm
Function:
verb
Etymology: Middle English demen, from Old English dEman; akin to Old High German tuomen to judge, Old English dOm doom
transitive verb : to come to think or judge
: CONSIDER
<deemed it wise to go slow>
intransitive verb : to have an opinion
: BELIEVE

 

fi·as·co
Pronunciation: fE-'as-(")kO also -'äs-
Function:
noun
Inflected Form(s): plural -coes
Etymology: French, from Italian, from fare fiasco, literally, to make a bottle
: a complete failure

 

pin·na·cle
Pronunciation: 'pi-ni-k&l
Function:
noun
Etymology: Middle English pinacle, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin pinnaculum small wing, gable, from Latin pinna wing, battlement
1 : an upright architectural member generally ending in a small spire and used especially in Gothic construction to give weight especially to a buttress
2 : a structure or formation suggesting a pinnacle; specifically : a lofty peak
3 : the highest point of development or achievement
: ACME
synonym see
SUMMIT
[pinnacle illustration]