Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Mrs. Primack's English Class

Writing the Introduction and Transition Paragraph
HOME
ABOUT ME
Is Google Making Us Stupid?
HOMEWORK
9TH GRADE ENGLISH
VOCABULARY-GRADE 9
INDEPENDENT READING PROJECT
AMERICAN LITERATURE
VOCABULARY- GRADE 11
WRITING HELP
DOCUMENTING YOUR SOURCES
CLASS PROCEDURES AND RULES
TIPS AND HINTS
IN DEPTH...
FUN STUFF
CLASS BULLETIN BOARD
STUDENT NEWS

THE INTRODUCTION

Get right down to business! Avoid inflated, rhetorical introductory remarks (commonly known as "fluff"). If, for instance, your paper is on abortion, you shouldn't waste limited space with some irrelevant and long-winded spiel about what an important and controversial issue abortion is. Nor should you start your paper off with a sentence like, "Down through the ages, mankind has pondered the problem of..."
            An introduction is best thought of as a reader's guide to your paper. It should help make it easier for the reader to follow and understand your paper. It should include an explicit statement of what it is that you will be arguing for (that is, your thesis).

The introduction should also map out the structure of your paper, explaining the order in which you will argue for various points and explaining how all those points come together in support of your thesis.

 

To sum up, a good introduction should:

 

(1) be concise,

(2) contain a clear statement of your thesis,

(3) introduce, very succinctly, your topic and any key terminology,

(4) indicate, very briefly, what the main line of argument will be, and

(5) map out the overall structure of your paper.

 

 

TRANSITION-DEFINITION PARAGRAPH

 

It should define for the reader any important terminology and/or provide any important background necessary to help the reader understand your topic. This paragraph should be neutral.  That is, it should not take a position on either side of the topic.  Sources should be cited.  You might include a dictionary definition if appropriate.  Be sure to cite the dictionary. 

 

THE INTRODUCTION

 

Get right down to business! Avoid inflated, rhetorical introductory remarks (commonly known as "fluff"). If, for instance, your paper is on abortion, you shouldn't waste limited space with some irrelevant and long-winded spiel about what an important and controversial issue abortion is. Nor should you start your paper off with a sentence like, "Down through the ages, mankind has pondered the problem of..." 


            An introduction is best thought of as a reader's guide to your paper. It should help make it easier for the reader to follow and understand your paper. It should include an explicit statement of what it is that you will be arguing for (that is, your thesis).

 

The introduction should also map out the structure of your paper, explaining the order in which you will argue for various points and explaining how all those points come together in support of your thesis.

 

To sum up, a good introduction should:

 

(1) be concise,

(2) contain a clear statement of your thesis,

(3) introduce, very succinctly, your topic and any key terminology,

(4) indicate, very briefly, what the main line of argument will be, and

(5) map out the overall structure of your paper.

 

 

TRANSITION-DEFINITION PARAGRAPH

 

It should define for the reader any important terminology and/or provide any important background necessary to help the reader understand your topic. This paragraph should be neutral.  That is, it should not take a position on either side of the topic.  Sources should be cited.  You might include a dictionary definition if appropriate.  Be sure to cite the dictionary.